Destinations

 
 
Sailing Itinerary
Day Port Arrive Depart
January 7 Houston, TX    
January 8 Galveston, TX 4:30PM
January 9 At Sea - -
January 10 Cozumel, Mexico 7:00AM 4:00PM
January 11 George Town, Grand Cayman 10:00AM 6:00PM
January 12 Falmouth, Jamaica 8:00AM 5:00PM
January 13 At Sea - -
January 14 At Sea - -
January 15 Galveston, TX 7:00AM

 



Galveston, Texas

Galveston Island is Texas' top historic destination, offering 32 miles of relaxing beaches, great seafood, tropical scenery, superb restaurants, marvelous downtown shopping, breathtaking Victorian architecture, numerous antique stores, incredible art galleries, plus tons of attractions, entertainment venues and world-class sportfishing.

 



Cozumel, Mexico

The Conquistadors first saw Mexico from the shores of Cozumel while searching for gold. Today, visitors to the island continue to seek out gold and silver jewelry in the shops of San Miguel while having a great time in its many local bars and restaurants. Plus, the waters around Cozumel's sheltered coral reefs make this one of the best snorkeling areas in the world.

 

George Town, Grand Cayman

Grand Cayman is one of a group of three magnificent tropical islands Christopher Columbus called "Las Tortugas" (the turtles) for the sea creatures he found in the ocean water. The designation did not endure, however, for on later maps the islands were labeled the Caimanau, the Carib Indian word for "crocodile." The name "Caimanas" refers inaccurately to the iguanas native to the islands, which were perhaps at one point mistaken for crocodiles. Among other attractions, visitors to the island will enjoy learning about the turtles, visiting the town of Hell, exploring Seven-Mile Beach and enjoying the undersea world.

 

Falmouth, Jamaica

Step off the ship and step back in time. It may not appear so at first glance, but quaint Falmouth was an economic powerhouse and center for dramatic social change during the English Colonial Period. Founded as Martha Brae Point in 1769 by local English planter Thomas Reid, Falmouth became the shipment hub for sugar plantations covering the hills of Jamaica’s North Coast. From the wharfs of Falmouth, sugar, molasses, rum and coffee were sent to England, while ships making their way from across the Atlantic dropped anchor in the bustling port town to deliver other necessities of 18th century life. In today's Falmouth, visitors still enjoy 19th-century Georgian architecture as well as river bamboo raft rides, arts & crafts shopping, and flavorful local fare.